Sometimes, no matter how much one cares and would like to intervene, it is not feasible or appropriate.


After a cold and wet start to the day, the sun is now shining and it is quite pleasant. The morning flew by and it is only now, that I am taking a short break(accompanied by a deliciously strong cup of coffee) to update here and attend to a few outstanding emails.

Yesterday, we finally received our “stimulus package” cheques ($900.00 each) in the mail. Personally, I still think the money should have gone to those on welfare payments or re-training those who have been retrenched but it’s here now and I have decided to give mine to Prue, so she can put is towards the Doula course she is undertaking . There is a lot I could have done with it but Prue is and will always be my priority. The costs associated with her course include several costly texts and then there are the on going tuition fees, so she will be able to put the money to good use.She has been looking forward to undertaking this course for a long time and now she has begun studying, she is taking to it like a duck to water!

Thanks to those of you who took the time to comment on the last post. I believe the dream was just reinforcing what I already know to be fact. Sometimes, no matter how much one cares  and would like to intervene, it is not feasible or appropriate. I know that but I think the dream was a subtle reminder from my subconscious.

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5 thoughts on “Sometimes, no matter how much one cares and would like to intervene, it is not feasible or appropriate.

  1. Hi Maureen, we are getting only $250 each over here but anything is good right now. By the way ….what’s a Doula?
    Peace
    Glen

  2. Maureen,

    I’m so glad that you actually got your stimulus money, although I agree with you that the way the governments decide to distribute the money makes no sense at all.

    And, what’s a Doula?

  3. Hi Glen,
    Thanks for visiting.
    A doula is an assistant who provides various forms of non-medical support (physical, emotional and informed choice) in the childbirth process. Based on a particular doula’s training and background, the doula may offer support during prenatal care, during childbirth and/or during the postpartum period. A birth doula is a care provider for labor. Thus a labor doula may attend a home birth or might attend the parturient woman during labor at home and continue while in transport and then complete supporting the birth at a hospital or a birth center. A postpartum doula typically begins providing care in the home after the birth. Such care might include cooking for the mother, breastfeeding support, newborn care assistance, errands, light housekeeping, etc. Such care is provided from the day after the birth, providing services through the first six weeks postpartum. In some cases, doula care can last several months or even to a year postpartum – especially in cases when mothers are suffering from postpartum depression, children with special needs require longer care, or there are multiple infants.
    Best wishes
    Maureen 🙂

  4. Hi Lita,
    Thanks for your comments.Now the money is here, I am going to put it to good use( Prue for books and fees) but the Government should be looking out for those who are most in need.
    A doula is an assistant who provides various forms of non-medical support (physical, emotional and informed choice) in the childbirth process. Based on a particular doula’s training and background, the doula may offer support during prenatal care, during childbirth and/or during the postpartum period. A birth doula is a care provider for labor. Thus a labor doula may attend a home birth or might attend the parturient woman during labor at home and continue while in transport and then complete supporting the birth at a hospital or a birth center. A postpartum doula typically begins providing care in the home after the birth. Such care might include cooking for the mother, breastfeeding support, newborn care assistance, errands, light housekeeping, etc. Such care is provided from the day after the birth, providing services through the first six weeks postpartum. In some cases, doula care can last several months or even to a year postpartum – especially in cases when mothers are suffering from postpartum depression, children with special needs require longer care, or there are multiple infants.
    Take care
    Maureen 🙂

  5. Hey Maureen,

    Thanks for the info, but I could have just read Glen’s answer!

    That sounds like a really interesting field to be in. What kind of Doula is Prue training to be?

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